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Dayenu Welcomes Biden’s Paris Agreement Pledge and Calls for Historic Action to Secure a Just and Livable Future

With President Biden’s announcement of the United States’ Nationally Determined Contribution, it’s commitment under the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions over the next decade, Dayenu: A Jewish Call to Climate Action, released the following statement from CEO and Founder, Rabbi Jennie Rosenn:

“After rejoining the Paris Agreement, President Biden’s announcement regarding the United States’ Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) is an important step to place our country on a path towards a just, sustainable future. The pledge reflects the urgent need to cut emissions to avert the worst impacts of the climate crisis. As the cost of clean energy continues to fall, wildfires, storms, flooding, droughts, and other extreme weather events have made clear the very high costs of inaction. It is critical that the NDC meet the scale that science and justice demands, with the US contributing its fair share to turning the tide of the crisis. Dayenu calls on the Administration and Congress to enact bold regulations and policies to meet and exceed today’s commitment

“These emission reduction targets are promises we make to the world, but we’ve made promises before, and broken them. In Judaism, words are significant and vows are sacred. Today, we must hold one another and our leaders to these commitments because it will take all of us to fulfill our communal vows and promises. As the largest historic greenhouse gas emitter, America has a responsibility to act decisively and quickly, given the urgency of the unfolding climate crisis. Today’s announcement represents an important step in taking such action.

“Dayenu will continue to demand ongoing action from the Administration and Congress to support the transition towards a sustainable and just future. Most immediately, we need a just, green recovery from the pandemic that supports clean energy, good paying jobs, equity, and justice. To that end, we urge swift passage of economic recovery and infrastructure legislation. This is a timely opportunity to provide critical investments in energy efficiency, clean energy, and transportation. Passing this legislation would demonstrate a commitment to reaching and raising the United States’ emissions pledge, and is just one of many ways Congress and the Administration can work to slash greenhouse gas emissions and rapidly transition to the clean energy future we need.

“It is time to make bold promises and keep them.”

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Jewish activists take climate change fight to halls of power

JWeekly

What can one person do about climate change? For Grace Wallis, the answer is simple: a lot, but not enough. “Individual actions don’t create direct change, immediate change, in the areas that are most effective — which would be policy change,” she said.

That’s why the 23-year-old Stanford grad student is focusing not only on modifying her own personal actions but also working to mitigate climate change at the state level, lobbying lawmakers in the Capitol on issues such as fracking and pollution. She’s been doing it with the help of climate organization Dayenu, a New York-based national endeavor that is helping to mobilize the Jewish community on what it sees as the No. 1 issue of our time.

“Policy is really impactful, and community is really impactful in the face of climate change,” Wallis said. “And that’s what Dayenu is really about.”

Founded in April 2020 by Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, Dayenu was set up to give ordinary people the tools and information they need to get educated, raise awareness and pressure elected officials on environmental issues. They’re encouraged to set up their own groups, called “circles,” to work autonomously at the community level, but with coordination and support from the national organization. According to Dayenu’s director of organizing Vicki Kaplan, there are nine Dayenu Circles in the Bay Area so far, with more forming each week.

“I think the fact that people are starting Dayenu Circles shows just how much appreciation there is in the Jewish community for bolder and more direct collective action to address the climate crisis,” Kaplan said.

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Buoyed by Biden’s American Jobs Plan, Dayenu Calls on Congress to Support Historic Investments in Clean Energy, Good Jobs, and Justice

“As we begin the long path to recovery from the pandemic, it’s our moral obligation to rebuild a clean energy economy that is equitable and sustainable for all, for generations to come. When faced with existential crisis, the Jewish community must respond as our biblical ancestors did in Egypt: with organizing, leadership, and decisive action.” -Rabbi Jennie Rosenn

NEW YORK, NY – As President Biden proposes the largest investment in clean energy and infrastructure in U.S. history today in Pittsburgh, Dayenu: A Jewish Call to Climate Action, released the following statement from CEO and Founder, Rabbi Jennie Rosenn:

“We applaud President Biden’s vision for economic recovery and job growth through bold climate action and a focus on racial and economic justice. With the announcement of this historic proposal, Congress has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to deliver real economic stability and benefits to Americans across the country, particularly those from historically marginalized groups, while accelerating the transition to a clean energy future. With 77% of Americans supporting further Congressional action to accelerate recovery from the pandemic, there is a public mandate for affordable, accessible clean energy and infrastructure built by American workers making a living wage. Now is the time for Congress to put the country on a path towards a just and sustainable future for generations to come.

The Passover story reminds us that when faced with an existential crisis we must respond – as our biblical ancestors did in Egypt – with dedicated organizing, leadership, and decisive action. Through Dayenu’s ongoing Just, Green Recovery campaign, the Jewish community will continue to demand swift passage of an economic recovery and infrastructure package that delivers clean energy, good jobs, and justice.”

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Spielberg donates Genesis Prize money to justice nonprofits

Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Steven Spielberg said Thursday that he will donate his $1 million Genesis Prize to 10 nonprofits that are working for racial and economic justice. The film director and his wife, actress Kate Capshaw, will match those donations with $1 million of their own.

In February, Spielberg received Israel’s prestigious 2021 Genesis Prize in recognition of his contribution to cinema, his philanthropic works and his efforts to preserve the memory of the Holocaust.

“America is facing a crisis, and our responsibility is to act now,” Spielberg said in a statement, adding that Judaism and Jewish history provide “the ethical precepts commanding us to work for a more just and equitable world.”

Spielberg will donate to Avodah, Black Voters Matter, Collaborative for Jewish Organizing, Dayenu: A Jewish Call to Climate Action, Jews of Color Initiative, Justice for Migrant Women, National Domestic Workers Alliance, Native American Rights Fund, One Fair Wage and Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism.

“We admire these organizations for their honesty and moral imagination and urge all those who share this vision to join us, so that the work of these non-profits may continue and grow,” Spielberg said in a statement.

Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, Dayenu’s founder and CEO, said the group was honored by the donation.

“This grant is a timely recognition that climate justice is a Jewish issue, and that confronting the climate crisis requires addressing racial and economic injustice,” Rosenn said in a statement.

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Judaism and climate change conference hosted by ASU highlights activism, veganism

JEWISH NEWS

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz is fighting climate change one vegan meal at a time.

Veganism transforms an individual and the whole family unit, Yanklowitz said, because it makes people more thoughtful about what they are eating and why. It also heightens their awareness of the impact they are having on the environment.

“I’m very grateful for those working on political revolutions, but I want to be on the side of a spiritual revolution that starts person by person, home by home,” he said.

From changing an individual’s diet to garnering community support for legislative changes, Jewish leaders across the country gathered to discuss the best ways to take on climate change.. Yanklowitz was one of five activists who addressed the relationship between Judaism and environmental activism during the Judaism, Science and Medicine Group’s annual conference hosted by Arizona State University via Zoom on Feb. 28, 2021.

In 2014, a Public Religion Research Institute survey found 78% of American Jews consider climate change either “a crisis” or “a major problem” — the highest proportion of any religious group in America.

But that sentiment doesn’t necessarily translate to action.

“There was amazing work happening, there continues to be great work happening and we need more — for the Jewish community to fully show up in all of our people and power and play a critical role in the larger national climate movement, and in turn, the global climate movement,” said Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, founder and CEO of Dayenu. She launched the organization last April to mobilize the American Jewish community to confront the climate crisis.

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Jewish leaders need to step up on climate change

Religion News Service

As the Biden administration gears up to combat climate change, I’d like to see the leaders of my religious community at the forefront of those rallying to the cause.

It’s not as if the Jewish rank and file are unconcerned. Back in 2014, a PRRI survey found that fully 78% of us consider climate change either “a crisis” or “a major problem” — the highest proportion of any religious group in America. And there’s no shortage of Jews involved in large secular environmental organizations, to say nothing of a number of small Jewish ones.

But the leadership of the communal umbrella organizations has pretty much been missing in action.

How come?

The question was posed at the opening panel of the Big Bold Jewish Climate Fest, an online agglomeration of discussions, performances, presentations, rituals and workshops that took place at the end of January around Tu B’shvat, the festival known as the “New Year of the Trees” that has become the annual focus of Jewish environmentalism.

“Why isn’t climate change high on the communal agenda?” asked organizer Lisa Colton.

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We must approach the challenge of Tu B’Shvat with vision and strength

The Forward

After four tumultuous years, many Americans saw Inauguration Day as a turning point for our nation. The swearing-in of President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and a new Congress marks a new chapter in U.S. history, but it should not — and can not — be seen as a “return to normalcy.” There is nothing normal about this moment.

In the last year, we’ve witnessed a deadly global pandemic, taken refuge from raging wildfires and destructive storms, participated in record-breaking mobilizations protesting police brutality and systemic racism, voted in a historic election and watched in horror as white supremacists attempted to stage a violent coup. These converging crises make clear what many of us have known for a long time: that our society is in need of a re-assessment.

Going back to “normal” is no longer an option. Addressing these existential crises will be the work of our lifetimes. As we enter the Jewish holiday of Tu B’Shvat, the “new year of the trees,” we reflect on what it means to be rooted in that work.

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Arizonans join in Big Bold Jewish Climate Fest

Jewish News

On Jan. 27, the Big Bold Jewish Climate Fest kicked off five days of free virtual programming both celebrating Tu B’Shevat and calling for climate action. Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, founder and CEO of Dayenu, told viewers the time has come — even that the time is past — for the Jewish community to be passionately involved in climate justice.

“It’s about whether we believe that every human being is created in the image of God,” Rosenn said during one of the festival’s opening panels held live on YouTube.

David Machbitz, 18 and an engineering major at Arizona State University, shares Rosenn’s passion. He will be one of hundreds of presenters in the national festival.

When he first became interested in climate activism, it took him by surprise. He spent most of his time thinking about school and science, but in 2019 he suddenly became interested in social justice and political action. Inspired by Greta Thunberg, he started thinking more deeply about climate change during his senior year in high school. He remembers watching Thunberg’s activities and thinking, “Whoa! This is something I should do something about.”

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Getting Bigger and Bolder: The New Jewish Climate Movement

Jewish Boston

In August 2015, I received a surprising email. It was from Brian McLaren, an evangelical author and activist, inviting me to be part of a historic ecumenical and multi-faith response to Pope Francis’ Laudato Si encyclical and visit to the United States that September. The event was called “Coming Together in Faith on Climate,” and I was one of two national Jewish leaders asked to present, alongside the likes of Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse.

Five years ago, there were only a handful of rabbis and cantors who were taking public action on climate change. It was a strange feeling to be one of them. On the one hand, as a newly minted rabbi, I was excited by the opportunities to speak, write, sing, and organize for climate justice, often in interfaith contexts.

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